Human Rights Agreement United Nations

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (USSR) is an important milestone in the history of human rights. The declaration, drafted by representatives of different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly Resolution 217 A) as a common standard of performance for all peoples and nations. It presents for the first time that fundamental human rights must be universally protected and that they have been translated into more than 500 languages. Recognition of the intrinsic dignity and equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world, based on the achievements of the UDHR, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights , which came into force in 1976. Both alliances have developed most of the rights already enshrined in the UDHR, effectively linking them to the states that have ratified them. They define everyday rights such as the right to life, equality before the law, freedom of expression, the right to work, social security and education. Together with the UDHR, alliances form the international law on human rights. The declaration formed the basis for two binding UN human rights pacts: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. The principles of the Declaration are established in other binding international treaties such as the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the International Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the United Nations Convention Against Torture and many others.

The declaration continues to be frequently cited by governments, academics, lawyers and constitutional courts, as well as by those who speak to their principles of protecting their recognized human rights. [77] 3.